Modern adaptations

Wedding cake toppers are small models that sit on top of the cake, normally a representation of a bride and groom in formal wedding attire. This custom was dominant in US weddings in the 1950s where it represented the concept of togetherness.[19] Wedding toppers today are often figures that indicate shared hobbies or other passions, if they are used at all.[19] Some of them can be really funny, approaching unusual themes.[20] Wedding cakes can also be decorated with flowers. In the United Kingdom, the traditional wedding cake is made from a rich fruitcake, although many modern cakes now consist of either vanilla sponge, chocolate sponge or carrot cake. Most cakes are between three and five tiers in height. Among some more elaborate cakes the United Kingdom see are those prepared for the Royal Weddings. A wedding cake topper is a small model that sits on top of the wedding cake, normally a representation of the couple in formal wedding attire.The wedding cake topper was dominant in United States weddings in the 1950s where it represented togetherness.[1] Today, these decorative figurines are often part of the couple's decorative theme or wedding reception style.[2] Traditional wedding cake toppers depict the couple in formal attire and are often the only part of the cake which can be kept over the years, apart from photographs of it.[3] While traditionally the bride and groom were in formal atire, with the bride in a long white wedding dress, complete with veil, and the groom in black morning dress,[4] today there are many more designs available.[3] There are specific ones for the style and theme of the wedding, for instance, traditional toppers for a formal wedding, and for le s formal ones, there are comical wedding cake toppers or ones depending on the couple's hobbies.[3] In recent times, wedding cake toppers have reflected the growing diversity in marriages. Multi-ethnic wedding toppers are now available,[5][6] as are same-sex wedding toppers.Fruit cake (or fruitcake) is a cake made with chopped candied fruit and/or dried fruit, nuts, and spices, and (optionally) soaked in spirits. A cake that simply has fruit in it as an ingredient can also be colloquially called a fruit cake. In the United Kingdom, certain rich versions may be iced and decorated. Fruit cakes are often served in celebration of weddings and Christmas. Given their rich nature, fruit cake is most often consumed on its own, as opposed to with condiments (such as butter or cream).The earliest recipe from ancient Rome lists pomegranate seeds, pine nuts, and raisins that were mixed into barley mash. In the Middle Ages, honey, spices, and preserved fruits were added. Fruit cakes soon proliferated all over Europe. Recipes varied greatly in different countries throughout the ages, depending on the available ingredients as well as (in some instances) church regulations forbidding the use of butter, regarding the observance of fast. Pope Innocent VIII (14321492) finally granted the use of butter, in a written permission known as the 'Butter Letter' or Butterbrief in 1490, giving permission to Saxony to use milk and butter in the North German Stollen fruit cakes.[1] Starting in the 16th century, sugar from the American Colonies (and the discovery that high concentrations of sugar could preserve fruits) created an excess of candied fruit, thus making fruit cakes more affordable and popular.